Viva la Mort
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Otherworld Theatre
3914 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60613
Drama
Runs May 16Jun 09, 2024

It’s the Conspirators, but With Music!

A Pop-Icon Returns to Her Hometown to Wreak Havoc on Her Aging Ex

The Conspirators present the world premiere of Viva la Mort, written by Sid Feldman and directed by Wm. Bullion, at the Otherworld Theatre, 3914 N. Clark St., May 16 – June 9. The production includes one preview performance on Thursday, May 16 at 7 p.m. with the press opening Friday, May 17 at 7 p.m. The regular performance schedule is Thursdays – Sundays at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 and may be purchased online with student and senior discounts available. Information and tickets can also be found at www.otherworldtheatre.org.

Viva, a superstar singer, Michigander and pop-icon (whose career spans four decades), returns to her hometown and to her just-as-aging ex, Mortenson Miller. Is the return out of generosity or revenge? Content Warning: songs, style, and possibly killer wolverines. Performed—with songs!—in The Conspirators’ inimitable style.

“Viva la Mort is a bit of a departure for us,” said director Wm. Bullion. “I mean, you WILL laugh, but you may also cry or be terrified!” “While most of our recent work has been clearly political and satirical in nature,” added writer Sid Feldman, “this piece appears on the surface to be more of a traditional narrative. It does have political implications—but they are more disguised.”